Trounson Kauri Park

an enchanting walk by day … a magical kiwi, bird & insect kingdom by night

Trounson Kauri Park is a 450 hectare forest reserve restoration project.  It seeks to restore the former richness of native biodiversity this forest once boasted, allowing people to enjoy a glimpse of what pristine kauri forests were once like.

In 1890 when the kauri timber industry threatened to wipe out all significant areas of  Northland kauri forest, 3.34 hectares were set aside by the government to create a Scenary Preservation Club and an early settler, James Trounson, added a further 22 hectacres.  Trounson then offered a further 364 hectares and the area was officially opened as Trounson Kauri Park in 1921.

The establishment of this protected area then led to the protection of the Waipoua Forest and the giant kauri trees such as Tane Mahuta in 1952.  To this day, Trounson Kauri Park is an enduring example of community and government co-operation.  Managed by the Department of Conservation, the park is one of the predator-free mainland islands of New Zealand.

Night Walks

Being predator-free means that Trounson Kauri Park is one of the few mainland places where Brown kiwi can be found living in their natural habitat.  The night walk into the forest takes guests into the nocturnal environment of approximately 200 kiwi.  Kiwi mate for life and visitors on the night walk can usually can hear the repeated squawking call of the male kiwi and the lower more mumbling response from the female bird.  Sightings cannot be guaranteed but many guests come back to the lodge delighted at having glimpsed this very rare and shy flightless bird.

In addition to kiwi, the protected and unspoilt environment of the Trounson  Kauri Park is home to many other native creatures such as kukupa (native wood pigeon) pekapeka (bats), weta (insect) and the kauri snail.